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West Chester (513) 777-2450
Fax (513) 755-1357

January 2020

Monday, 27 January 2020 00:00

Symptoms of Athlete’s Foot

If you notice a rash on your foot, you may have a condition that is known as athlete’s foot. It is a common fungal infection that is contagious, however there are methods that can be implemented which may prevent athlete’s foot from developing. This type of fungus lives and thrives in moist and warm environments, which can include public swimming pools, communal showers, locker rooms, and surrounding areas. It is beneficial to wear appropriate shoes while in these types of places, as it may prevent the fungus from touching the skin. Common symptoms that are typically associated with this ailment can include dry skin between the toes and on the bottom of the feet, as well as severe itching. Additionally, in more severe cases, the skin may peel and crack, and the skin between the toes may burn. If you are afflicted with athlete's foot, it is strongly advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can guide you toward the proper treatment.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Bennet Grad from Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Published in Blog
Monday, 20 January 2020 00:00

Pain in the Back of the Leg

Patients who have experienced an Achilles tendon injury are often familiar with the pain and discomfort this condition can cause. It can often be debilitating, and may considerably restrict the ability to walk and run. This tendon is located in the calf, and it connects the calf muscles to the ankle. This type of injury can happen as a result of being overweight, exercising on uneven surfaces, or wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. Some of the symptoms that are associated with a partial or complete tear of  the Achilles tendon can include swelling, severe pain in the back of the leg, and it may be difficult to move the ankle. If you think you may have an Achilles tendon injury, please schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible so the correct treatment can begin.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Bennet Grad of Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Sunday, 19 January 2020 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 14 January 2020 00:00

Common Causes of Running Injuries

Many running injuries occur due to the repetitive motion the sport requires. This can often result in overuse. There are a number of reasons running injuries occur, and many of them can be prevented. For example, errors in your training can cause running injuries, as well as poor running form. A lack of stretching or warming up can also lead to damage while running. Wearing the improper footwear is another factor that influences the development of an injury due to running. Some signs of overuse include the gradual onset of pain, the feeling of stiffness or aching after a run, noticeable swelling or tenderness, and overall discomfort during or after a run. If you feel you have an injury caused by running and would like advice on treatment, we suggest you consult with a podiatrist for professional advice and care.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Bennet Grad of Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 06 January 2020 00:00

What You Need to Know About Your Bunion

When the base of your big toe begins to jut outwards, that is normally a sign that you may have a bunion. This can occur due to a deformity with the toe joint, causing the big toe to begin to bend towards your other toes. Unfortunately, bunions are often accompanied with both pain and discomfort felt in the affected area. When this occurs, it is suggested you seek professional care from a podiatrist. They may develop due to hereditary reasons, as well as due to wearing tightly fitted shoes, socks, or tights, that do not conform to the shape of your foot. Bunion pads can be worn to help alleviate the pressure felt on the bunion, and icing the affected joint can be used as a means to lessen the pain experienced. For a proper diagnosis and an advised treatment plan, we suggest you consult with a podiatrist.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Bennet Grad of Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
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