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West Chester (513) 777-2450
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Tuesday, 07 December 2021 00:00

Corns and calluses are thickened areas of skin that form as a means of protection on the feet. These thick areas primarily form where the skin has rubbed against something like a shoe. Thickened areas of skin that are larger and irregularly shaped are known as calluses. They usually indicate issues such as bone deformity, improper footwear, or a poor walking style. Hardened areas of skin that are smaller with a central core are known as corns. A variety of corns can form, including soft corns, which usually develop in areas that are moist from sweat or inadequate drying between the toes. Corns that contain nerve fibers and blood vessels are known as vascular corns, which can be very painful. Other types of corns include hard corns, fibrous corns, and seed corns. Patients with corns or calluses that persistently irritate their foot should consult with a podiatrist for treatment.  

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Bennet Grad of Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Thursday, 02 December 2021 00:00

Though it often affects athletes, an ankle sprain can happen to anyone, anytime, and anywhere. Sometimes all it takes to sprain an ankle is to land awkwardly after a jump, or twist your ankle too much as you step off a curb. Symptoms of an ankle sprain include pain in the ankle, particularly when trying to move it or put weight on it, and swelling. If you are feeling these symptoms following an injury, stop what you are doing and rest the affected ankle. Use ice packs wrapped in a towel and elevate your injured ankle to reduce swelling. You can also compress the ankle by wrapping it with an elastic bandage. A sprained ankle needs to heal fully and properly to avoid re-injury. If you have sprained your ankle, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Bennet Grad from Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 23 November 2021 00:00

When the fibrous tissue on the sole that connects the heel with the front of the foot (plantar fascia) becomes damaged and inflamed, this is known as plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis can also cause tense muscles in other parts of the foot and calf. Sometimes stretches can ease some of this tension and discomfort in these muscles as well as the plantar fascia. Simple calf stretches are a good place to start. To get a good stretch in the affected foot, place it behind you—flat on the ground—with the leg and knee straight. The other leg should be bent in front of you with that foot also lying flat, and your hands placed against a wall in front of you. Hold that position for 10 seconds and then release. You should feel an easy stretch in the calf and heel of the affected foot. Rolling a foam roller or ball back and forth under the affected foot while seated can also provide a good stretch in the foot. For another gentle calf stretch, sit on a chair and either curl a towel on the floor or pick up marbles with your toes. If your plantar fasciitis does not improve or is severe, a podiatrist can offer many solutions to treat it.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Bennet Grad from Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 16 November 2021 00:00

Some babies are born with flat feet and as they grow, the tendons in their feet tighten and formulate arches, typically by the time they reach 2 or 3 years of age. If arches never develop in babies feet, or they present only when they are sitting or on their toes, this is known as rigid flatfoot or flexible flatfoot, respectively. Flatfoot may be asymptomatic, or produce symptoms such as pain on the outside of the ankle, or achy, tired feet after playing sports or standing for extended periods of time. Calf muscles may also be tight, and there can be problems walking, standing, or balancing. If you are experiencing symptoms like these, contact a podiatrist to be diagnosed and treated properly. To determine if your condition is rigid or flexible, the podiatrist may ask you to stand on your toes. If your arch becomes visible while standing on your toes and collapses when you place your foot on the floor, you may be afflicted with flexible flatfoot. If your arch never presents (even while on your toes), the podiatrist may order a CT scan, MRI, or X-ray to make a diagnosis of rigid flatfoot. Your podiatrist may prescribe custom orthotics or special shoes to provide arch support and relieve pain, and/or calf muscle stretches to help improve ankle range of motion (dorsiflexion). If these more conservative techniques do not offer relief, surgery may be necessary to relieve pain, repair tendons, and restore the arch.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Bennet Grad from Bennet Grad, DPM. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in West Chester, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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